How to Survive a Gluten-Free Earthquake


What hell a SoCal earthquake hath wrought.

What hell a SoCal earthquake hath wrought.

Before any of you lifelong Californians or folks from the Far East jump in, let me just inform you that I come from the land of tornadoes, came of age in the land of the occasional terrorist attack, and am very, very new to the land of the “you-never-know-when-it’s-coming” earthquake. I guess it’s just what you’re used to because, HOLY HELL THESE EARTHQUAKES ARE FREAKING ME OUT!!!!

I mean, let’s be honest, not as much as a terrorist attack, but still. It’s been a shaky couple of weeks. And one thing I worry about, of course, is what to eat during a disaster. OK, once I know no one is dead or seriously injured, ALL I think about is what I’m going to eat. Red Cross isn’t gluten-free you guys. (Is it? Maybe I’m unnecessarily judging.) Anyhoo.

We have stockpiled water, some canned goods (but let’s be honest, not cooked? that’s gonna’ suck) and randomly some V8 in case things get really desperate. Which is why I was stoked to get a box of RATIO bars from those nice folks right after a couple of medium ones hit.

gluten-free emergencyI’m not totally a “protein bar” kind of girl, yet I am a gluten-free eater who can get really ‘effing sick if I don’t have anything but gluten around. Like, you know, while traveling, after an earthquake, etc. In addition to the gluten-freeness, there aren’t any GMOs up in here, no soy protein, no artificial ingredients and no hormones. None of us need hormones, especially during a natural disaster. Since RATIO has peanut butter, well, I’m all set. I mean, I’ll have to fight that dino for it, but I’m feeling pretty excited about my stash the next time a biggish one comes.

Do you have an emergency gluten-free stash?

21 Comments

Filed under Celiac Disease, Reviews, Uncategorized

21 responses to “How to Survive a Gluten-Free Earthquake

  1. I have found i can’t eat any sort of protein bars, they are just too processed for my system, which seems to be increasingly more sensitive……we have MRE Rations and a lot of freeze-dried food for emergency, 1000gallons of stored water. There most important thing to me in case of survival is to have PLENTY of WATEr to Drink, because the body can Easily last 40days with little or no food, but will die in under a week with no water, maybe as little as 3 days would cause death. So here’s to hoping disasters don’t rule our lives, so we can continue to enjoy Healthy Options in a progressing society vs. surviving devastation.

  2. Alicia

    No, but I should probably get one. I’m in OKC, and tornado season is supposed to start this Wednesday. Not to mention all the earthquakes we’ve been having here — what’s the deal with that?! I had some of those Elisabeth Hasselbeck bars stashed at work for an emergency, but I’m not exactly a fan of hers — I’ll definitely start a stockpile of Ratio bars. Thanks!

  3. Stepanie

    Strangely enough I do spend time pondering this question??? Just what the hell would I eat in case of a disaster? Here in Idaho we get the occasional earth quack, hurricane (three times in 13 years) so my biggest worry is Yellow stone and that damn super volcano, in which case from what I’m told it would be impossibe to out run and all of us would be toast (literally). I still store water, rice, beans, nuts, gf granola stuff….ya know I figure I can at least go out will a full tummy for how ever long we may last. Maybe I can even still cook….either way would hate to get fried while in the bathroom. : /

  4. Some areas here in San Diego felt them too. Most of SoCal is built for this, so try not to worry too much. I always have either Vega smoothie mix or Raw Meal and we have bottled water and usually a stash of shelf stable almond milk. I should check out the Ratio bars- do they have whey?

  5. Not that I really need an emergency stash, but we always have lots of nuts and canned beans, not to mention who-knows-what stashed in the freezer that we could eat as it defrosted. We’d definitely last at least a day or two…but here in NYC earthquakes at least seem unlikely. (Though there was that teeny tiny one a couple years ago that “shook us up.”)

    • Vik

      Oh, those beans. I got rid of all my cans of beans, took them back to the store once I was diagnosed and found out they were processed on shared equipment or had wheat in the facility. Did you find some that turned out to be processed in a dedicated facility? We also have nuts, raisins, Lara bars, and almond and rice milk, water.

      • Really? I’ve never had problems with beans, ever. Which ones bother you?

      • Vik

        Replying to your question about which kinds of beans bother me? I am pretty new to the celiac party, I’m a year in with being gluten-free, after decades of misdiagnosis. I have read a lot about cross-contamination. I hear about dried beans and especially lentils not always being safe because they are often grown near or in the case of lentils, often rotated with wheat in the fields, and beans and lentils are also often processed in the same facility as gluten grains. I have yet to find any beans or lentils that are certified gluten-free. I have seen canned beans that said they are processed shared lines with wheat, and dried ones too, once I called the company and asked. I buy Rancho Gordo beans and rinse them a ton, and hope it’s okay. I don’t get immediate glutening symptoms, so don’t know what specifically might have gluten CC. I really want to get all my long time issues cleared up, so I am extra careful about everything. So, when you say you never had any issue with beans, do you mean canned ones or dried ones?

      • Yes, in the beginning especially it’s important to be super duper careful. I use both canned and dried and haven’t had any issues. There is a school of thought, however, that I explored when I did the Whole 30 and that is that beans are one of the many foods that are inflammatory. In other words, they have the tendency to inflame your already jacked up system. So if cutting the beans out for awhile helps you heal faster, you should totally do that. But, in general, beans are safe for celiacs. Of course, all of our bodies are different so if something makes you feel sick, ditch that. Good luck!

  6. Good thought. I don’t have a gluten free non-perishable emergency food stash. I do have Kind bars, that I use when hiking though. Hmm. Time to stock my pantry.

  7. Rebecca

    Go Macro bars are so good! GF, organic, vegan, macrobiotic, and non-GMO.

  8. Katy

    Kind bars, Uber bars, Mojo bars, a pile of nuts.

  9. emisformaker

    This reminds me that I need to establish an emergency kit before the summer blackout season is upon us. Also, and slightly off-topic, it reminds me of the other day when I was considering donating blood until I wondered whether they would have GF restoratives (cookies). We really need to be prepared to fend for ourselves at all times, don’t we?

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